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Whitening

Whitening

The simplest case of restoring a smile is when the teeth, especially the front teeth, become stained from certain
foods that have a tendency to discolor teeth. In younger patients, where the underlying teeth show only a little wear
and the enamel is intact over the entire surface of each tooth, whitening, or bleaching, the teeth quickly attains a winning smile in one visit.

Whitening is also effective on teeth that have been discolored by antibiotic treatment during childhood.

Longevity of treatment is determined by one셲 diet and proper dental hygiene. Avoiding tobacco, tea, coffee, and certain fruit juices, all of which have a tendency to discolor teeth, will prolong the life of the bleaching procedure.

Lax tooth brushing can leave unpleasantly colored teeth, especially along the gum line. Proper brushing reduces or eliminates this kind of discoloration, but over time, staining may prevail and require professional treatment for removal via bleaching.

Bleaching can be performed in one visit and repeated many times over a lifetime if the enamel remains intact. Bleaching kits are also available for home use.

If you want to whiten your teeth, the best place to start is with a healthy mouth. Damaged teeth, oral infections, and other gum problems should be treated before whitening. The reason for this recommendation is that bleaching sensitive gums and teeth can cause much discomfort, and can cause irritation of inflamed gums. Bleaching, however, is an easy procedure for most patients whose oral health is good.

One final note about whitening: Teeth whitening treatments work only on natural tooth enamel. Whitening is temporary on teeth whose enamel has worn away, exposing the dentine layer. Whitening is not effective in removing stains on fabricated crowns, veneers, bonding materials, or tooth-colored fillings.

Bonding

Bonding

Restoring modestly worn, chipped, stained, or mis-spaced teeth can be achieved by applying a layer of a composite resin, which is a family of high-strength, cement-like materials. Because bonding can be applied as a thin coat, like a coat of paint, bonding is often used to brighten the teeth of older patients who have had some enamel worn away from many years of normal use.

Although, fast and relatively inexpensive to apply, bonding is not permanent, nor can bonding restore a large damaged area of a tooth. Bonding will usually show signs of wear within four or five years.

Bonding is less expensive and less durable than veneers however, bonding can be repeated several times over the lifetime of the patient without damaging natural tooth.



Veneers

Veneers

When visible teeth show signs of wear, surface damage, misalignment, or chipping, the placement of veneers, or laminates, can restore normal form, appearance, and whiteness to recover a warm, beautiful smile.

Because modern ceramic veneers are thinner and stronger than traditional porcelain, moderate misalignment can be corrected by reshaping the tooth with a ceramic veneer. Much more of the original tooth can be retained than was possible with materials used in the past. If there are wide spaces between the teeth, however, other methods of restoration may be preferable, because large areas of veneer can crack or become detached by a strong bite.

Placing veneers on the front teeth is also very effective in restoring a bright appearance for teeth that have had much of their protective enamel worn away from many years of use, which exposes the softer dentine layer of teeth. This is a normal process. The underlying teeth can be healthy, but the softer dentine layer stains much more easily than hard enamel, therefore, bleaching is only a short-term solution. For mildly damaged teeth, the application of a veneer is a durable, long-lasting way to restore a youthful dental glow.

 

One disadvantage to veneers is the requirement that some enamel must be removed to accommodate the veneer covering. If a patient셲 teeth are only discolored, less invasive procedures, such as scaling and bleaching, are probably better choices. Often, younger patients opt for bleaching, while older patients may prefer bonding or veneers.

 

Veneers, inlays, on-lays, and full crowns usually require two visits to the office, and a third visit may be necessary for some patients.

Note : Enamel shaping involves modifying teeth to improve their appearance by removing or contouring enamel. The process, which often is combined with bonding, usually is quick and comfortable and the results can be seen immediately.

 

Inlays, On-lays


Inlay refers to the filling of a cavity that has been created by decay or physical damage. Damage to the tooth is minimal and the tooth is healthy.

On-lays are similar to inlays, but on-lays replace a larger portion of an ailing tooth than do inlays.

Gingival-Related Issues

Gingival-Related Issues

Staining near the Gum Line of Crowns

Staining near the Gum Line of Crowns


As we grow older, the gums tend to recede, which exposes some of the lower part of a crown. In mild cases, this is not a problem. Some patients, however, will have noticeable discoloration of the bottom of the crown, which is caused by a naturally occurring chemical, called melanin. Melanin is what gives color to our eyes, skin, and hair. Gingival melanin stains the lower part of the crown. In our younger years, this colored portion is not visible, but begins to appear as our aging gums recede. Bleaching is a fast treatment for minor discoloration, while more severe darkening of the gingiva can be resolved with laser treatment.

Crown Lengthening

Crown Lengthening


Some people have a problem of too much gum; these people are said to have a 쐅ummy smile. If your teeth appear to be too short, your teeth may actually be of proper lengths, but too much gum tissue covers them.

Surgically reshaping the gum line is the treatment. Treatment may span several teeth to even your gum line to expose a natural and broad smile.


Braces are not just for kids. Orthodontic treatment may be a viable option in resolving crooked, crowded, or spaced teeth for adults, as well.

Ceramics

Crown Lengthening

Porcelain and ceramic dental materials are glasslike materials that are used for fillings and for the reshaping or the replacing of crowns. Porcelain or ceramic restorations are particularly desirable because of their strength and their color, which mimics natural tooth enamel. Modern ceramics, however, are chemically and physically more like natural teeth than is porcelain.

Porcelain is harder, but more brittle, than natural teeth, which tends to cause the wearing down of opposing, natural teeth. The use of ceramic resolves this problem, because the physical hardness of ceramic is similar to natural teeth. Ceramic is also translucent to light and has a very natural look, while porcelain is opaque and does not appear quite as natural as ceramic.

All porcelain and ceramic restorations require a minimum of two visits and possibly more.